Threads by latest replies - Page 15


Bike recommendation

No.1286897 ViewReplyOriginalReport
Have to chose one of these /n/

https://www.cube.eu/en/2019/bikes/trekking/tour/nature/cube-nature-exc-allroad-blackngrey-2019/


https://www.stevensbikes.de/2019/index.php?bik_id=97&cou=US&lang=en_US

Which one should I take? I normally do between 30 to 40 km every day, mostly cycling trough asphalt.
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No.1284847 ViewReplyOriginalReport
buses dont have seatbelts its a conspiracy to kill the kids
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No.1283842 ViewReplyOriginalReport
A major issue in the United States is that many cities, their suburbs, and surrounding broader region have little to no public transportation infrastructure.

Everyone has to drive everywhere for everything.

This consumes vast sums of oil, generating vast sums of CO2, also necessitates a constant demand for more roads+urban sprawl to keep pace with roads becoming congested.

Efforts to ameliorate this are very haphazard, in contrast to the roads and other infrastructure public transit planning seems to be left down to the lowest level of planning at the city council/county level.

So one area maybe implements a bit of a BRT, another area maybe has a little lightrail, and a third area has some regional locomotive.

With no coordination or cooperation.

And it may also have to be put to a vote allowing those with vested financial interests in maintaining Oil dependency to fund anti-public transit campaigns via sophisticated libertarian think tanks and fronts.

What these cities, their suburbs, and surrounding regions need is a comprehensive public transportation system compromising:
1) Regional & inter-urban rail connecting rural areas and regional towns/cities to one another and major cities
2) Commuter rail to and through a cities suburbia
3) Where appropriate Metro rail inside a city and urban area
4) Streetcars/lightrail, they're the same thing just new technology, on the road in and around the city center and urban area - in medium to low density cities Streetcars and Commuters working together in tandem are an effective alternative to a Metro, you hop off the commuter train and hop on the Streetcar outside and keep going.
They can also be very useful in regional cities, it might have a network of just 3 to 5 or more routes but as seen in Germany with their Tram-Train systems it can be connected to the mainline railways and provide additional services to other towns in the region in between the scheduled Regional and inter-urban trains
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No.1287124 ViewReplyOriginalReport
>select all images with bicycles

No.1277848 ViewReplyOriginalReport
Do Garratt-type locomotives have tenders?
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Winter Care

No.1283781 ViewReplyOriginalReport
How do you guys care for your bikes in the winter? Got home from a short commute totally covered in snow, washed off the delicate bits where snow had accumulated, relubricated the chain, wiped everything down. is this enough?
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Alignment charts

No.1284568 ViewReplyOriginalReport
Post 'em
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Steam Railroad Rankings

No.1276737 ViewReplyOriginalReport
I made a thing. This list includes all of the currently known steam train operations 15-inch/381-mm gauge or larger in the Anglosphere (US, Canada, UK, Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand) and grades them to see which are the best. It has 420 lines and 851 locomotives.

How it works:
Each railroad is graded on bell curves for the age of its right-of-way (older = better), the main line's length (longer = better), the track gauge (wider = better), how many working steam locomotives it has (more = better), and the age of its oldest steam locomotive (older = better). Lines with higher scores have a large scope from a technical and operations standpoint, and they tend to fully immerse you in another time and place better than those with lower scores. That doesn't necessarily means that those with lower scores are bad railroads; they're just small potatoes.

Discuss.
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No.1277342 ViewReplyOriginalReport
Virginia Museum of Transportation is in trouble (sort of).

>URGENT Message from our President! “Roanoke City Council will take up an important matter on Tuesday, Jan. 22nd that may adversely affect the VMT. There is a proposal to move the Campbell Court Bus Station to the parking lot directly in front of the Museum. We are asking everyone to come out and support the Museum by opposing this move.” Your support would be greatly appreciated. The meeting will begin at 7PM at the City Council Chamber on the fourth floor of the Noel C. Taylor Municipal Building, located at 215 Church Avenue SW, Roanoke.”

They probably don't want homeless gathering outside the museum and scaring away visitors, or something.

Live video of Roanoke City Council meeting:
FB.com/RoanokeVa/videos/1067877970085788/

http://www.vmt.org/
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No.1261443 ViewReplyLast 50OriginalReport
Daily reminder building railroads to all villages that have under 500 inhabitants is in fact not unrealistic. The French had such lines in the middle of the mountains in the early 20th century.

Daily reminder cagers started ruining everything starting in the 1920's when Fascists, and later, Nazis, built highways because le epin Keynesianism mandated that tons of asphalt be layered everywhere to create jobs.
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