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Young People’s Love of Cities Isn’t a Passing Fad

No.1340139 ViewReplyOriginalReport
https://www.citylab.com/life/2019/05/urban-living-housing-choices-millennials-move-to-research/590347/

>Young people have been a key factor in the back-to-the-city movement—so much so that one study identified “youthification” as a special kind of gentrification. But some demographic experts (and the conventional wisdom) predicted that young adults’ fascination with urban living would fade as they settled down, got married, and had children, at which point they, too, would follow their parents and grandparents to the suburbs.

>Perhaps not. A new peer-reviewed study (the article is forthcoming in the Journal of Regional Science) finds that not only have young people been a driving force in the urban resurgence of the past two decades, but they favor living in central urban neighborhoods significantly more than previous generations did at the same stages in life.

I think as we keep developing our city neighborhoods, we create places that are inviting for a wider swath of ages, so people stay there.

There’s still a massive amount of new development going on in our cities and innovations in design mean they’ll keep making inviting places for older residents.

>Over the three decades, each passing cohort of young adults became progressively more urban. Young adults aged 25-34 have indeed been key movers in the urban revival. But the shift precedes Millennials; it actually began with Gen Xers back in the 1990s. And the youngest cohort, aged 20-24, is the most urban of all. American adults aged 20 to 34 are much more urban, and much less suburban, than the Baby Boomers.